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Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Pondering the Reflections of Life and the Reflections of Love By Patricia Louise

This book is filled with sweet and uplifting poems, prayers and thoughts for each day. I liked it but I have read better books in a similar vein, so I am not sure whether I would actually buy it.

I didn't finish this book because I felt that it wasn't what I needed.

I received this free ebook from Book Look Bloggers in return for an honest review.

52 Little Lessons from A Christmas Carol by Bob Welch

I was really enjoying this insightful book by Bob Welch with its anecdotes about Dickens and its analysis of the characters and story and how we can learn from them,  but there was something wrong with the download, unfortunately, so I couldn't finish it.

I received this free ebook from Book Look Bloggers in return for an honest review.

A Selfish Plan To Change The World: Finding Big Purpose in Big Problems by Justin Dillon

This is an inspiring book about finding a cause and creating change.

In the first and second parts of the book Dillon delves into the psychology of creating meaning in our lives and why helping a cause which we are passionate about is actually selfish.  He discusses how many people are tempted by comfort and entertainment and putting 'survival and control' over meaning. This is because lots of us want to actually contribute to a cause by using our skills instead of just donating money.

He tells his own story about why he decided to start a campaign against slavery and he provides many examples of people who also found their passion in helping others.  These include Billie Holiday who sang a famous song about lynching of African Americans in the Deep South and William Blake who who wrote poems about the terrible poverty of nineteenth century England.  He also gives modern examples.  These people found what Dillon calls their 'riot' (the cause to which they want to dedicate their lives) and found  what they were 'born to do'.

The problem with this book, I felt, was that the last part was rather vague about how to use your talents and education to carry this out.  It's probably easy enough for most readers to find something which they really want to change but it's difficult to start a charity or a foundation or even make people more aware of important issues.  I didn't really feel that this part of the book helped me that much.

I received this free ebook from Book Look Bloggers in return for an honest review.

Thursday, June 15, 2017

A Web of Friendship Selected Letters (1928-1973) by Christina Stead

A character in a story by Jame's Joyce wanted 'real adventures'.  He reflected that real adventures 'do not happen to people who remain at home: they must be sought abroad'.  Christina Stead, an ambitious young writer, also went abroad in search of adventures that couldn't be found in the provincial Australia of the 20s, although she longed to come back when she was older.

She writes luminious letters full of life about her adventures in Europe and America, which are full of life and discuss almost everything under the sun, including her impressions of London, Paris and New York, philosophy, politics and books.  In one letter she relates a dinner in Paris with a Serbian anarchist poet hailed by Picasso and an Emir, the head of a famous Arabian family, people she would not be likely to meet in Sydney.

I like her descriptions of the sights and the food the best, however.  Even though she dislikes London, she still writes about the squares in autumn in an almost loving way.  She loves the 'millions of light fluttering leaves --limes, plane-trees and beeches'.  She recounts the food and drink that she buys in Paris which includes unsalted butter, Russian herrings and halva and cheap white Burgundy wine.

She also writes about life with her gentlemanly husband, an American Marxist financier - a rather strange combination - and the books she is writing.  I haven't read any of Christina Stead's books, partly because some of them sounded pretty depressing.  However, if the books are better than these letters, I will put them on my TBR list!

I received this free ebook from NetGalley in return for an honest review.

EDITION  Paperback
ISBN         9780522862041
PRICE      $24.99 (AUD)


Sunday, June 11, 2017

The Light-Hearted Quest by Ann Bridge


High Atlas, Morocco by Nouari0 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Common

This is the first book in a series about Julia Probyn, an intrepid woman who becomes involved in solving mysteries. When Julia's cousin Colin disappears, his unhappy family decide to send her on a quest to find him. They are sure that he's still alive and safe but they find his actions odd. His sister Edina is especially upset and annoyed because she has to leave her highly-paid advertising career to take care of the Scottish estate.

Julia may look like a 'dumb blonde' (the author's words) but she is an extremely clever and practical young journalist who can charm anybody, including her long list of boyfriends
who appear to propose at the drop of a hat! Julia discovers that Colin is in Morocco, perhaps smuggling, and sets off on a small, rather dirty boat that is not at all what she is used to! However, she makes the best of it and she soon becomes friends with the crew, especially a helpful officer, Mr. Reeder.

She is able to use her journalism as a cover in Morocco and she also obtains a job as a secretary to a rather eccentric archeologist. Julia's journey takes her all over Morocco and she certainly has to keep all her wits about her because she doesn't know who she can trust! However, she has a good time along the way - this book actually made me hungry at times because Julia  has delicious French food in some fine restaurants and always manages to find excellent picnic lunches as well! She also spends a lot of time in a bar trying to obtain information from the owner.

The Light-Hearted Quest is a travelogue as well as a mystery story. Bridge's descriptions of Morocco are colourful and vivid and she includes lots of interesting historical information, especially about the Phoenicians and Romans.  Anyone who reads it will want to go to Morocco.

This book was written in the 70s and, be warned, it's not politically correct.  None of this worried me, except for the anti-Semitism, which I found rather shocking.  Bridge praises the French colonists highly which may not go down well with some readers. I didn't know much about Moroccan history and the book has made me more interested in it.

I really enjoyed this rather frivolous story with its likeable heroine, interesting characters, exotic setting and its touch of romance.  I can't wait to read the rest of the series!

I received this free ebook from Net Galley in return for an honest review.


Monday, June 05, 2017

What Regency Women Did For Us by Rachel Knowles

Maria_Edgeworth_by_John_Downman_1807

This is an enjoyable and enlightening read for fans of the Regency or British history.  Rachel Knowles's lively and entertaining style makes thes interesting women come to life.  These enterprising women include Eleanor Code who had her own business manufacturing artificial stone, Caroline Herschel who was the first woman to discover a comet and the novelist Maria Edgeworth.  In a time when women had few basic rights and intellectual women were regarded in a derogatory manner, these women managed to have their own careers and overcome many obstacles.

I especially liked reading about Eleanor Code who even manufactured stone for King George III.

I received this free ebook from NetGalley in return for an honest review.

EDITION
Paperback

ISBN9781473882249

PRICE£12.99 (GBP)